Collection: Part Three - Personal Project Proposal

Unit 7 - Exhibitions

Marina Abramovic Talk: Early Years (Serpentine Galleries)

Marina Abramovic on The Artist Is Present (2010)

Gallery Visit at Raven Row

The Inoperative Community is an exhibition of experimental narrative film and video works that address ideas of community and the shifting nature of social relations. It draws on work made since 1968 for cinema, television and the gallery, reflecting the overlapping and entangled histories of these sites.

Including artists: Serge Bard, Eric Baudelaire, Ericka Beckman, Cinema Action, Patrick Deval, Lav Diaz, Mati Diop, Stephen Dwoskin, Luke Fowler, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Pierre Gorin, Johan Grimonprez, Marc Karlin, Stuart Marshall, Anne-Marie Miéville, Pere Portabella, Yvonne Rainer, Jackie Raynal, Anne Charlotte Robertson, Helke Sander, Jon Sanders, James Scott, Albert Serra, Leslie Thornton and Humphry Trevelyan.

Implemented a reliable playback system for 26 films, across 8 screening rooms, with the bulk of the programme changing daily.

All content plays at the scheduled time automatically, meaning gallery staff need only turn projection equipment on and off daily. For gallery visitors the viewing experience is discrete and inconspicuous.

Furthermore, adjustment to the schedule for special events such as talks or late openings are easily made in advance.

Jackie Raynal: Deux Fois, 1968 (Photo by Marcus J. Leith)
Jackie Raynal: Deux Fois, 1968

Ericka Beckman: You the Better, 1983 (Photo by Marcus J. Leith)
Ericka Beckman: You the Better, 1983

Leslie Thornton: Peggy and Fred in Hell: Folding, 1984-2015 (Photo by Marcus J. Leith)
Leslie Thornton: Peggy and Fred in Hell: Folding, 1984-2015
Photos by Marcus J. Leith

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Saatchi Gallery: Soheila Sokhanvari - Moje Sabz 2011 Taxidermy, Fibreglass, Jesmonite blob, automobile paint

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Maha Malluh - 'Food for Thought'; 478 burnt pots

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Virgile Ittah - 'Echoue au Seuil de la Raison'; Mixed wax, marble dust, pair of unique cast iron beds

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Virgile Ittah - 'Echoue au Seuil de la Raison'; Mixed wax, marble dust, pair of unique cast iron beds

Virgile Ittah’s early work, represented here, is a study in the fragilty and transience of human flesh. Life-size abject bodies formed of wax people the gallery space, spectral apparitions that seem un-tethered by gravity. These are trapped in some interstitial zone of being, a limbo between life and death, perhaps even at the moment of the last gasp before the soul flees its mortal shell.

The pale figure, almost melting, bears a particular resonance today in the midst of a migration crisis, in which the bodies of those leaving their home are mortified at the hands of both smugglers and destination states.

..In this she states “When I make a sculpture I’m not trying to make a sculpture, I’m trying to make a living human being’, an effect achieved with uncanny results. Each figure variously represents different autobiographical narratives, and areas of research such as the history of female hysteria..

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Alice Anderson - '181 Kilometers', 2015; Sculpture made after performances, copper thread

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Alice Anderson - 181 Kilometers

The work 181 kilometres, commissioned especially for the Saatchi Gallery, bears testament to the intensely physical activity of sculptures. Anderson walked 181 kilometres to ’spun’ an entire sphere with copper thread that took days to create, allowing the artist to enter an almost Zen-like meditative state of concentration and choreography. As the artist herself explains: The first works that I’ve done involved performances. Since the beginning I’ve experienced my body through movement and today the wire is for me an extension of it. The sculpture Bound was conceived in 2011 alongside is a body of work made for the Freud Museum in London, and references a game Sigmund would play with his young grandson in order to calm what Freud saw as his anxiety of his mothers’ absence. As part of the game he would throw a bobbin and bring it back over the edge of the cot with a string.

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Stability, 2015 - Bordiglio Imperial Marble

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'Duality', 2015 - Black Zimbabwean granite, White statuary marble

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Harmony Korine - Scapp Willter Circle, 2015, oil on canvas, 84 × 102 inches (213.4 × 259.1 cm). Photo by Rob McKeever

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Wellcome Collection - Tibet's Secret Temple

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The exhibition that I saw was ‘Tibet’s Secret Temple’ – which allowed me to think about what mindfulness actually is and its links to Buddhism – the idea of focusing on the moment and forget stressful situations that have already occurred and that we kept thinking about it, and not dwelling on those that might be ahead – which is something I was really drawn into. By meditating yourself using our own body/living and listening to yourself, I think it is the best way to train our mind. I came across two very interesting quotes at this exhibition that I had watched in a room wherein the Sixth Dalai Lama says: ‘I have seen in my wanderings great temples and shrines, but none are as blissful as my own body.’ and, ‘The world we see is a painting, born from the brush of discursive thought. Within or upon it nothing truly existent can be found. Knowing this one knows reality; seeing this one sees what is true.’ I found these quotes very inspiring and led me thinking back to Marina’s The house with the ocean view’ where she placed herself in the gallery for 9 days without talking, eating food – just only act a basic human routine like sleeping, sitting, taking a shower, and drinking water, etc. Both research led me thought about doing my video performance and record in writing by taking away ‘avoiding those obsessions and addictions I’ve been attached to my daily routine rather than embracing it. I found this strong connection between the two and allowed me to come up with an idea of doing meditative activities.

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Wellcome Collection - State Of Mind

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Wellcome Collection - State Of Mind

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LCF MA Exhibition, 2016

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Erwin's sculptures @ Tate Modern

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Erwin's sculptures @ Tate Modern

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Erwin's sculptures @ Tate Modern

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Selfie obsessions @ Tate Modern

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Performing real life @ Tate Modern

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Performing for the Camera @ Tate Modern

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Performing for the Camera @ Tate Modern

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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My thoughts - Art Basel Fair

It was such a rewarding day for me to see Art Basel fair this year which was taken place in Hong Kong. I was really appreciated to see variety of works including paintings, sculptures, drawings, installations, photographs, particularly video and editioned works of the highest quality which are something that I wanted to see in particular in order to foster my thinking into my idea of displaying my final video outcome for the show. As first I wasn't quite sure about the TV and the process of how to curate this sort of artwork in the real thing, in terms of making the spaces tidy and clean with all the cables hidden, etc. There are so many video artworks in this exhibition in which their works have been laid out in different configurations and scale - which I found really interesting. I was so glad to see the video artworks by Bill Viola displaying in 5 different flat screens with sounds which is the one that i've been research earlier since the first start. I loved how Viola creates works that combine filmed images and music in what he calls “total environments that envelop the viewer in image and sound.” Also I was quite drawn into the elements of birth and death that roots in both Eastern and Western art and spiritual traditions within his video images, I think it was very powerful singular installations with interesting loops of the videos that observe the visitors as they come in and gaze up. I really admired its simplicity of his work but within that it articulates life and what it all means to us as humans; reflect back to own own experience of emotions and basic life cycle. As I watched his video in the soundless Quintet of the Astonished, I get into experience that alternates between electronic scores and silence, and pursuing timeless themes like birth, death, and extremes of emotion. There were five figures in the throes of a powerful feeling which are filmed in ultra slow motion - I found this very clever way of editing video process.

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Video artworks by Nam Paik

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Art Basel Fair - Video artworks by Nam Paik

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Bill Viola's Video Performance

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Central Hong Kong - Paper sculpture

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Bangkok citycity gallery - Korakrit Arunanondchai's performance

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Bangkok citycity gallery - Korakrit Arunanondchai's performance

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Bangkok citycity gallery - Korakrit Arunanondchai's performance

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Bangkok citycity gallery - Korakrit Arunanondchai's performance

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Marina Abramovic: 512 Hours 11 Jun 2014 to 25 Aug 2014 from Serpentine Gallery website

Marina at Midnight: Serpentine Diaries

Raven Row: 'The Inoperative Community'

Inoperative Community? Unreviewable exhibition, more like. There are over 50 hours of material in this show of ‘experimental narrative film’. The programme in the screening-room changes daily, while single-work galleries run pieces that last several hours, on average. So, while the accompanying catalogue optimistically encourages you to watch each work from start to finish (yes, even Lav Diaz’s ‘Melancholia’, which clocks in at an extravagantly tedious eight hours), the reality is that you generally drift between rooms, experiencing random segments. In other words, the footage I watched during my visit is almost certain to be completely different from what’ll be playing during yours.

source:

http://www.timeout.com/london/art/the-inoperative-community

http://www.aestheticamagazine.com/review-of-the-inoperative-community-at-raven-row-london/

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My thoughts: Video and Films at Raven Row

It was my first time seeing this gallery – Raven Row. I found the gallery space really interesting and the scope and ambition of The Inoperative Community. The show features seven films permanently on loop in rooms of their own, and a main screening room with a weekly programme of 19 moyen-metrage to feature length films. It was amazing to see over 50 hours of film screened. First I wasn’t quite sure which one should I look first – but I managed to watch 4-5 films on that day. I found that common to each of these works is the dissolution and dislocation of community, and the rooms of Raven Row are put to use in making each film an isolated experience – which I found really motivating.

I was really drawn into the four-hour selection from Anne Charlotte Robinson’s 34-hour opus Five Year Diary (1981-97) at the beginning of a visit, and then again at the end. I liked how it gives its own sense of her struggle with mental illness and various obsessions. For me I think we are probably unable, more likely unwilling to watch the whole four hours that emphasises the complexity of the individual’s experience as a node in a system – or outside of it. I think it necessarily implies from truly connecting with others, and this has a strong connection with my work as I am looking at the idea of people’s obsession. After watching this I began to think about the process of documenting my video performance and the context within it – I want to film myself for hours to see the development of my reactions and also to notice myself how am I going to overcome with my real life performance with both obsessive/non-obsessive habits for longer hours. This is something that I will carry out this week and in one-week time. Another thing that I was drawn into was the fact that the exhibition was like a community that brought people to come together to watch. Although a community isn’t a real, concrete thing, but I guess it was an abstraction, a fantasy, something that exists only in the mind. Just as it would be impossible to meet or even identify every member of a particular community, so it’s impossible to view everything in this show. All I get was a kind of diffuse, highly personal impression from the exhibition, which I found really inspiring.

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More research on Anna's Five Years Diary

The Anne Charlotte Robertson Collection

Bequeathed to the Harvard Film Archive in 2012 by the filmmaker, the Anne Charlotte Robertson Collection contains approximately thirty-five finished short films, a few video works and the diary film project, Five Year Diary, as well as photographs, audio tapes, diaries and letters.

Anne Charlotte Robertson (March 27, 1949 - September 15, 2012) was a Super 8 filmmaker and diarist who lived in Framingham, Massachusetts. She began making films in the mid-1970s as an undergraduate at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Her main work is the thirty-eight-hour opus, Five Year Diary, which she began in 1981 and continued filming well beyond five years. Spanning varying numbers of days, each episode is twenty-seven minutes—approximately eight camera rolls—and the diary is eighty-three reels long. In addition to the Five Year Diary (1981-1997), Robertson made over thirty other short films—mostly diaristic—including Apologies (1990), Talking to Myself (1985), Magazine Mouth (1983) and Melon Patches, or Reasons to Go On Living (1994).

Robertson took the written diary form and extended it to include documentary, experimental and animated filmmaking techniques. She did not shy away from exposing any parts of her physical situation or emotional life. She became a pioneer of personal documentary and shared experiences and observations on being a vegetarian, her cats, organic gardening, food, and her struggles with weight, her smoking and alcohol addictions, poverty and depression (she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder). Romance (or lack thereof), obsession and the cycle of life are also long-running themes in the Diary films. Robertson sows seeds, reaps vegetables, cooks and pickles them, then composts the scraps. She welcomes babies and buries family members and beloved cats, notes the changing seasons, contemplates suicide, has nervous breakdowns, pines for her celebrity crush (Tom Baker of Doctor Who), finds religion and obsessively documents her own life on film, paper and audio tape.

Robertson recorded sound on film at the same time as the picture with a sound Super 8 camera. She created a multi-layered soundtrack by recording audio cassettes to play with the films. Adding a performative element to her shows, she often spoke during a film screening and also occasionally played the radio. Her work touched many people and inspired a number of women filmmakers. In 2001, she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Filmmaking.

source: http://hcl.harvard.edu/hfa/collections/robertson.html

This led me to think about the process of creating a video performance of my personal obsessive habits as part of my experimental works. I will create a variety of trials with different video editing processes and try out different footages as my project progresses.

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Saatchi Gallery: Champagne Life - Taxidermy

Describing herself as a “cultural collage between East and Western philosophy” the work of Iranian-born artist Sohelia Sokhanvari shuttles between political commentary and symbolic totem. Her taxidermied sculptures appeal to the literary genre of magic realism, in which ‘reality’ is punctured with fantastical events, revealing meanings more profound that naturalism could hope to do. Sokhanvari points to the use of the form as a method by which artists have been able to “create an open-ended narrative to promote or resist a totalitarian political system”.

Visual metaphors abound in her work that deals implicitly with the Iranian state. The title Moje Sabz speaks to the ‘Green Movement’ uprising of 2009, in which violent protesters’ demonstrations lead to the annulment of a fraudulent election result.

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Maha Malluh - 'Food for Thought'; 478 burnt pots

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Maha Malluh - 'Food for Thought'; 478 burnt pots

Living and working in Saudi Arabia, artist Maha Malluh’s work centres upon the impact of globalisation and consumer culture within her nation. “My inspiration for art comes from my country, a land of contrasting images and ideas. Good art… forces you to pause, to contemplate and think harder about your surroundings.” Her sculptures are assemblages of objects found in junk shops and flea markets, their decrepit state speaking volumes of the culture that once valued but has now discarded them. Food for Thought – Al-Muallaqat is composed of aluminium cooking pots used traditionally throughout the Arab world. The title Al- Muallaqat links the installation to pre-Islamic 6th century Suspended Odes or Hanging Poems traditionally hung in Mecca. What poetry then do these pots contain? And of what lives and stories could they sing?

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Sigrid Holmwood - 'Old Woman Hugging a Goat', 2008

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Alice Anderson - 'Bound', 2011; Bobbin made of wood and copper thread

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Alice Anderson - 'Bound', 2011; Bobbin made of wood and copper thread

How do we remember? What is the shifting relevance of the physical world in a society increasingly part of a digital one? Alice Anderson meditates upon the loss of the tangible, weaving items in copper threads to create ‘recorded objects’, ossifying the formal qualities of the things that lie disregarded around us through a ritualistic process. The material of copper speaks to the computational world that it has enabled through its transference of energy and information, Anderson also relates it to the neural transmission of information across our own organism, a gesture of connection and communication that is borne out in the very process of her artwork’s process which is sometimes undertaken by teams of volunteers.

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REVELATIONS: NEW WORK BY AIDAN

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REVELATIONS: NEW WORK BY AIDAN

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Thoughts:

From the first glance, the softly cone-shaped sculptures in black Zimbabwean granite have a mysterious yet arresting presence. Head-height, it is uncertain if they are human or something else.  But then walking around these ghostly creatures, it is clear they are sort of weighty nuns or maybe muhajabi (women ensconced in Islamic veil). But the matronly mein is not precisely visible there either; I only know they are women based on the presumption of a symbolic black burka, under which the figures remain completely anonymous. I found this very astounding piece.

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'Diana', 2016

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REVELATIONS: NEW WORK BY AIDAN

Aidan's work reveals the influence of multiple artistic traditions, reflecting her academy training in Soviet Moscow in the 1980s, her subsequent exposure both to western art history and to contemporary western artists and her own personal investigations into the art and craft of her Azerbaijani and Uzbekistani heritage. In her practice she deconstructs prevailing artistic categorisations, eliding oriental and occidental, Islamic and Byzantine, non-figurative and figurative, ancient and modern. As much of her oeuvre sets out to question and reconsider inherited ideas, particularly as they relate to women and their role in society, her approach in deploying traditional artistic practices frequently involves identifying characteristic elements and reinterpreting them to convey her individual, progressive vision.

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Gagosian Harmony Korine Fazors - Work details

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Harmony Korine - 'Fazors' at Gagosian Gallery

“Fazor” alludes to the “phaser effect”: a musical swirl of oscillating sound that summons the hypno-psychedelic effects informing Korine's latest series of paintings. The large-scale, concentric circles that characterize this series expand upon the line and checker paintings in their embrace of vibrant color combinations. Inspired by sun motifs from the 1960s and 70s, the series conjures the Color-field paintings of Helen Frankenthaler, as well as the color spectrums of Robert Delaunay's Rhythm painting series. A combination of oilstick, acrylic, and house paint is applied to canvas or, in certain cases, reclaimed artworks from Korine's prior abstract series. The rings of each orb resemble the ripple effect, fanning out from a ten-sided star in the middle of each composition. The paintings also reveal improvisational marks, fingerprints, and inadvertent mistakes. Korine riffs on each work impulsively and embraces the physical vigor of repetition and pattern on a grand scale.

The Fazors oblige by the odd bliss of sensory assault; there is no beginning and no end to their effects. Like a tapestry at a headshop, a blazing star from MAD Magazine, or a Bridget Riley optical trance, these paintings thrive on surface tension. In Korine's figurative works, characters disappear and reemerge from a groundless terrain. Lurking ghosts and devilish characters fuse with dizzying loops at hyperspeed. Like Philip Guston's fleshy abstractions, they are animated by his loose touch. Together, the Fazors describe a world that expands and contracts like processed sound—the dream merges with the nightmare to envelop the viewer in the shimmer of the absurd.

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Tibet's Secret Temple: Body, Mind and Meditation in Tantric Buddhism

'Tibet’s Secret Temple’ explores Tibetan Buddhist yogic and meditational practice and their connections to physical and mental wellbeing.

Inspired by an exquisite series of 17th century murals from a private meditation chamber for Tibet’s Dalai Lamas in Lhasa’s Lukhang Temple, the exhibition features over 120 objects including scroll paintings, statues, manuscripts, archival and contemporary film, together with a wide range of ethnographic and ritual artefacts. Three of the murals from the temple have been recreated, by photographer Thomas Laird, as life-sized digital artworks that form the centrepiece of the exhibition.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpUaTwYl0lU#action=share

Wellcome Collection - Tibet's Secret Temple

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Tibet’s Secret Temple Exhibition 19 November 2015 - 28 February 2016 Tibet's Secret Temple: Body, Mind and Meditation in Tantric Buddhism Body, Mind and Meditation

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I went to the Wellcome Collection to see 'States of Mind' - and this exhibition focused on the viewer to explore their own understanding of the conscious experience - which I found really fascinating. It made me thought about what happen when our typical conscious experience is interrupted or undermined by something that triggers us to act that certain behaviours – I found this exhibition sort of related to my project by the fact that our human’s childhood experience, people and society that we’re in the past triggers and shape us to become a person today, as well as our emotions and thoughts that we’re addicted to it. From my own obsessive relationship with food, drink, cigarettes and social media as well as my own obsessive thought; all my obsessions that I can thought of, I felt my idea of our obsessive habit also comes down to our mind that are unconscious – e.g. obsessive feeling of boredom and stress stand as our natural and thoughtless process, a daunting and difficult process, a compulsive and comforting process, or something in between – which I found hard to express. I can see a strong connection between this idea of human consciousness and my project; our individual experience of the world, our everyday inner life as well as our interaction with an external reality.

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Wellcome Collection - State Of Mind

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Another thing that the exhibition depicted was that of our 'conscious selfhood' the experience of being you - is a key aspect of human consciousness. 'I' describes the subjective centre of our conscious experience and that indicates how language ends up becoming such an integral component in internalising consciousness.

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Wellcome Collection - State Of Mind

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My notes: 'State of Mind' at Wellcome Collection

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LCF MA Exhibition, 2016

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Erwin's sculptures @ Tate Modern

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Erwin's sculptures @ Tate Modern

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My Thoughts:

I’ve booked a ticket to see the Erwin Wurm Talks and the exhibition called Performing for the Camera. I found Erwin Wurm sculpture works and exhibition really interesting and I loved how the viewer can actually interact with his artwork by balancing our body to the time given with a variety of objects that they’ve provided – e.g. I tried out putting several books between my legs and kept my body stable for a couple of minutes. I found this exercise really fascinating and all the viewers were helped one another trying to make we look like a piece of sculptural art. I also tried out standing myself in a bucket and placed another bucket over my head and let someone to take a picture of me balancing my body. I totally loved this evening exhibition and I found making this kind of interactive artwork really exciting and thought-provoking. If I were able to do this kind of interactive artwork as my final outcome I would discuss with my tutor about this. I thought it was interesting to see the public interact with the artwork in various ways.

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Selfie obsessions @ Tate Modern

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Performing real life @ Tate Modern

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After that I then looked around the 'Performing for the Camera' exhibition and noted down names of various artist that I thought was interesting. The names are: Boris Mikhailov, Erwin Wurm, Amalia Ulman, and Ivars Gravlejs, etc. This exhibition made me think about the display of the photographic series that were mounted on the walls in the gallery. Most of the works were a mix of performance and video art but the way they display the photographs of performance in an organised way into different rows and grids made it look very eye catching. I also really interested in the work of Amalia Ulman – which was the photograph of herself taking a selfie and she displayed it in a large photographic scale – this made me think back about my idea of our obsession with our phone and mac devices which acts as a metaphor of our society and people today; we do concerned with our own self-image as well as we are really care about how we look to others. This led me to think about my own obsessions with social media – such as Instagram and Facebook, etc. I felt these are our addictions these days that phones are so attached with technology and the social world. I found this work really connected to my project.

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Artist's work title example - Art Basel Fair

Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Marina Abramovic's work display

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Art Basel Fair - Display of photographic outcomes (ideas)

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Art Basel Fair - Video artworks by Nam Paik

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Bill Viola's Video Performance

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My thoughts - Art Basel Fair

I looked around the works that displays with TV monitors and screens to see how they curate in an appropriate on its own way including headphones and plinths. I found that there were so many old-fashioned TVs that were being used in the Art fair - which I thought it looked amazing because its size and scale of boxy kind of monitor makes it look eye-catching and attracts more attention due to the size of the screen. They were displayed in a different way: some TV was displayed in a diagonal/slope orientation which looks bizarrely beautiful on its own and that made me wonder how did they manage to make it stand itself - while some of them were displayed in the middle of the space with out any plinths - which I found really outstanding. This made me think about my own TV that I will be using - first I was not sure about the aesthetic of putting the TV on the floor so I thought I would need a plinth to put my TV over the top to avoid any health and safety issues. So I might ask my tutor for further advises to see which is more appropriate. Looking at variety of video works display, has helped me to think about further equipment that I need to prepare for my Final Exhibition - e.g. I just realised that I need to buy a headphones and the cable that works with my DVD player in order to make the sound work properly. I took pictures of different positions of each tv were being displayed and how it has been tidied up nicely o make it look professional - which i found really helpful.

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Art Basel Fair - Bill Viola's Video Performance

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - Title of works

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - Marina Abramovic's work display

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Art Basel Fair - ideas for displaying video outcomes (considering the equipments)

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Art Basel Fair - Hong Kong

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Bangkok citycity gallery - Korakrit Arunanondchai's performance

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Bangkok citycity gallery - Korakrit Arunanondchai's performance

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My thoughts - Korakrit Arunanondchai, at Bangkok City Gallery

This was my first time seeing the actual performance art from the artist himself as it was very interesting and rewarding seeing his recent works even though they weren't directly related to my work, but performance art is a new area that i am really drawn into at the moment so i could do this form of artwork in the future. His performative art piece is called - ‘Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3’. I found his film and performance really difficult to understand during the first part of the show - but I could source out aspects of the work that could foster the creation of my own. i was not quite sure about the content and message that he is trying to convey but at the same time i felt he did not intend to expect the audience to get his idea straight away. Instead it has some emotional feelings that the viewer has as they’re watching this. I loved the part that he was painting his huge canvas his his body and pouring the paint bucket over his body and jumped over to the canvas - at the same time his artwork team were singing a thai song throughout his body paint performance which i found really emotional to listen. Also the elements and symbols that i can draw out in his video was the rise of denim culture with the importation and appropriation of western culture which affected everything from fashion to modern art, and this contrasts to our conservative traditional thai culture that i’ve been grown up. This gave me the idea to superimpose the video that i took when I was doing my obsessive routine performance, which is the element of a thai buddhist beliefs and cultures that i’ve always been enhanced by. It made me realise that this new element of religious belief would add to the mystical aspect of my work. His black velvet cloak which reminded me of my own belief of buddhism into the endless of time that is ongoing and how we live our lives as very sinful - Looking at the this elements of his work through my thinking/and my personal belief/experience really helped me visualise my final product and develop my idea further.

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